Siesta Sounds

| May 1, 2018

Marc Mosby Photo Credit: Dagmar

Ren·ais·sance man
noun
a person with many talents or areas of knowledge

   When Marc Mosby and the Instigators take the Beach Club stage for Cinco de Mayo, you’re going to hear some great music. Mostly reggae, some from very well known and much-covered international artists, plus though hard to distinguish from these giants, a lot of original tunes written by Mosby.

   Listen to the lyrics and you’re likely to find that in addition to pulling you onto the dance floor, these songs can pull you into different times and places and emotions. That’s due largely in part to the way Marc Mosby lives his life. After all, it’s said that music brings out what’s inside your soul, and Mosby’s life is nothing if not diverse.

   Not your stereotypical musician, Mosby balances his immense musical talent with other areas of life he finds equally compelling. Like his visual art. His home is littered with the paintings and pieces he creates not in pursuit of sales (although he’s had many,) but strictly as a passion. Tribal, abstract, and outsider art sits casually alongside portraits of old blues musicians and pieces of altered art, his wide range of styles and subjects presented in a variety of mediums.

   Painting on anything from smaller canvasses to 100 year old chairs to salvaged hoods of cars, Mosby can pretty much make art out of anything. Years before it was fashionable to offer “repurposed items” or “up-cycled art,” he had a showing on south Siesta Key of the huge metal pieces he’d created on salvaged metal. More recently he pulled what he refers to as “the hillbilly chair” out of the trash.

   “It’s at least 150 years old,” Mosby says, “all doweled together but falling apart now, so I made it so it holds itself together. The largest surface is the seat and I painted a Sioux Indian Chief on it.”

   During the day, he heads out east to a friend’s farm near Myakka State Park where he works with their horses. The animals inspire and energize him and he loves “just the pure interaction” with them. It makes sense that this would tap a part of his soul that’s not accessed by a life of working in dark crowded clubs and keeping vampire hours. It may be an old fashioned notion, but there’s much to be said for getting out in the sun and fresh air, away from the stressful city, and just being a person out in nature, enjoying the peace, quiet, and solitude. 

   Add Mosby’s love of travel and the complete picture comes into focus, along with many of the subjects of his songs. While saying he has loved every place he’s ever been, he admits a particular fondness for the Latin American countries. One of the favorite journeys he recalls took him to a sacred valley of the Incas, near Machu Picchu. He describes it as “…the most beautiful place I’ve ever seen on the planet.”

   All of this comes home with him and, sooner or later, finds its way into the music and art he makes.

Marc Mosby Photo Credit: Dagmar

   Another pleasure is playing his music surrounded by fans who love it and fellow musicians skilled enough to present it at its best. The primo lineup you’ll hear at the Beach Club for Cinco de Mayo Saturday (May 5, 2 to 5 p.m.) will be the best. With Mosby on lead vocals and guitars will be Billy Seward on guitar, Brandon Sommers’ keyboards and additional vocals, Burt Engelsman on bass, and Steve Camilleri on drums. It’s going to be a great way to spend your Saturday and kick off summer on Siesta Key.

Charmaine Engelsman-Robins is a Chicago-born, award-winning writer of screenplays and articles, including a 10 year stint writing for the Sarasota Herald Tribune. She has lived in SW FL most of her life and, as an animal rescuer, has occasionally been forced to support this work with temporary straight jobs that she lists on a secret “resume” titled “My Little List of Things I Never Want To Have To Do Again.” She won’t have to if you keep reading her articles, and she thanks you all very much for saving her from that horrible fate. 

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Category: Arts & Entertainment

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